Living The Life That God Has For Us....

God's Plumbline Ministries is called to repair devastation in the lives of God's people allowing restoration both physically and spiritually. Providing creative solutions for employment, education and life skills allowing God to repair and restore hope.  Empowering each community to establish a secure foundation both inside and out, while keeping in tact God given talents and uniqueness, not focusing on man's ways but God's ways.  Developing working relationships within social and economic circles, working hand in hand with community leaders to bring the love and compassion of Jesus Christ. 

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Adding Hope to Layers of Complicated



Adding Hope to Layers of Complicated 


The best way I know how to explain the work I do in Haiti is “layers of complicated”. Meaning, most solutions have multiple answers and some times you need to fix a handful of things to fix the first problem you intended to fix in the beginning.

Let me explain.
When we started our sewing school in Haiti in November 2007 our goal was simple.  Keep mothers and children together so that children wouldn’t be raised in orphanages.  

Step one:  Give women an education, teaching them to read, write and sew. This would create the ability to provide for their families. When the first class graduated, we very quickly found that Haiti had little to offer in employment. 


Step two: Find jobs for the graduates. We would create products (first purses) for visiting mission groups to purchase when they came to visit Haiti. We could create a small on site store for folks to purchase purses our ladies had made from donated fabric. This quickly grew into teams wanting to take out suitcases full of products to sell at home shopping parties. With the greater demand we could launch a website for on line sales.

Some of these layers had to do with the growth we experienced as our work expanded, which was great! The other kind of layer came from getting to know the ladies we work with and their life struggles. It also comes from learning the ebb and flow of the day to day unspoken challenges of poverty and dealing with life in a developing country such as Haiti.

I am still amazed at the things I learn on this journey of sustainability for women and children and the things I take for granted.  Have you ever thought about your front door, and what life would look like if someone could just come and take off your front door? Let’s say, you rented your house and the Landlord came and said, he wanted more money and until he got more money he would take the front door. You couldn’t get to the police, they won’t help and you don’t have a contract; no one told you you needed one. You just paid him the money so you would have a place to live. Really, it is just a tiny cinderblock house with three rooms consisting of a tiny kitchen, a sitting area and a space for one bed shared by your whole family. You don’t have a husband, you have small children and you are alone every single night with no one to watch over you. Thieves come to steal and can do unthinkable things to you, or worse your children.




But, what if the door to the house was your door because the house was your house? Now that would be a whole different matter.

Yes, this is the next layer to wanting mothers and children to stay together.
They need a place they can call home, a place they are safe, a place they can lay their heads at night in peace. A place they can lock the door.

Everyone, I would like for you to meet Vadette. She graduated from our first sewing school in 2008 and has worked for us as a seamstress for the past seven years.  She has always had the goal of having her own house.


While in Haiti at the end of October this year, I learned that her teenage daughter had experienced some of those unspeakable things I mentioned.  As I sat in the office at CrossFields, I shared my heart with the team, telling them I felt like I was to return to the work I had been doing in Haiti for this very reason. There was still work that needed to be done and our ladies still needed help, but this time in a different way.

After some time had passed we talked about what would it look like to help the ladies in Haiti, in the sewing program to be safe?  These conversations, some brainstorming and prayer led us to this…….

We are thrilled to partner with CrossFields to help Vedette complete her very own home. After all of her hard work over the years and many, many prays for a way to build her house she is going to be able to do just that, finish building her own house.  Yes, and lock her door too!


Construction will begin in January.
(So exciting!!)
I can't wait to tell Vedette her dream is really coming true!
I will travel to Haiti to help her coordinate the construction process that needs to being.
We can't wait to show you picture of the progress we make over the next few months.
Please continue to follow along with us here on the blog for updates.
You can also join us on Facebook

If you would like to support the work Vadette and the other Artisans are doing in Haiti you can shop and/or follow them at Haiti Design Coop

If you to know of a company or family who would like to partner with the Artisans in Haiti to help build their own house just like Vedette, please contact us and we will be happy to answer any of your questions.

Please note, mark all funds "Haiti Christmas Home" so we will know how we should apply your support for the work we are currently doing in Haiti.

Much Love to you and your families in this Christmas season!
The Lynch Family



Sunday, December 6, 2015

Hope - How Do We Give It




Hope.

Noun:
1. a feeling of expectation and desire for a certain thing to happen

Verb:
1. want something to happen or be the case



How Do We Give It?


Is It Measurable?


Can We Decide What It Looks Like For Another?


What Will Hope Look Like?  


On my last trip to Haiti I got to sit and talk with each one of these ladies. 
I admit I think they are beautiful and I admire them.
These five represent each class at the Women's Education Center. 
They act as Ambassador's, they are the voice for each class.

There are 130 women in school this year who will graduate in June.

At the end of my day, as I drove back to the house, we sat in traffic. Just like rush hour in any other city, but this city happened to be on edge because of the election run off results. 
For days everyone was on edge with reports of what "could be" for the next few days. 
Based on their history, none of it would be good.
Still, the ladies would come to school each day as they waited for news. I asked if they wanted to leave, to get home "before" trouble started. 
No, they would stay and talk with me. 
They shared their stories about life, family and why they came to school. Some for three years to learn literacy, sewing, cooking, cake decoration and crafts.

Now, as I sat waiting in the sea of traffic, unsure myself of what was happening on the streets, I thought about their words. 

About hope.

I was wrestling.

Life was hard.

I thought about Jacob.
The Jacob who wrestled with hope.
It doesn't say He wrestled with hope exactly, but if you know his story it was messy. 
He was looking for a new beginning.

Did I understand the weight of hopelessness and what it would look like for these ladies to not have the chance for an education?

Isn't hope woven in every new beginning? 
By definition: "A feeling of expectation, a desire for a certain thing to happen."

As we finished, I was cleaning up my notes and adding a few details when one of the ladies said to me, 
"this is where I found the way to my dream"

Whether a noun or verb, we can't dismiss hope is measurable in each and every life we come across on this journey.

I thought about the ladies sitting in traffic. I thought about the fact that we all draw on hope and the chance for new beginnings no matter where are live. 

---

Genesis 32:28
...you have struggled and have overcome. 






Thursday, September 3, 2015

I Can Still Hear Him



This was Oct. 2000 in #Haiti
Five very brave friends embarked on a journey that would change their lives forever. 
Technically, he was the baby of the five children. 
His tiny body was swollen from malnutrition. 
It hurt to look at his tight skin, his breathing was labored. 
To this day I can still hear him crying in my head. 
It is a sound no child should make, know or understand. 
I wondered about just how desperate his mother had to have been, sending him on a boat with five women she had never know. 
His story would be layers of complicated as well, 
A puzzle if you will. 
His father,  his mother, created boundaries that blurred lines between what was right and what was wrong. 
Only hints of the truth could be heard, mixed in the brokenness of my language in the early years. 
Oh such a tangled web we weave.

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

All Dressed Up




This was Oct. 2000 in #Haiti
Five very brave friends embarked on a journey that would change their lives forever. #comewhatmay 
Truthfully, this trip just started an argument in my head. 
Two hours from home and nothing was ok. Nothing! 
I had a choice #change or live in denial. 
It was now mine. 
Here is what I do know, never would I live life the same. 
We all agreed we would live a better story because of them, the other children and their brave mothers who let them go with us that day. 

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Candy seemed like a good idea

This was Oct. 2000 in #Haiti
Five very brave friends embarked on a journey that would change their lives forever. 
Her name is Shirley, she was dressed in her best. 
Traveling alone, oh so tiny and such an old soul. 
She didn't say a peep, ever. 
Her hair seemed red, a sign of severe malnutrition we would learn much later. 
For some strange reason it seems like a good idea to bring huge bags of suckers for the kids. 
Candy, it proved to break the barrier between us, like an unspoken language. 
She liked #hugs, always smiled, never complained. 
How?  
Looking at her, her story may seem carefree. 
And yet, in my mind I know it to be the farthest thing from the truth. 
How do you leave your family? 
Yet, she did, like so many others.

Monday, August 24, 2015

No One Believed Us


This was October 2000 in #Haiti.
Five very brave friends embarked on a journey that would change their lives forever. #comewhatmay 
She was the sickest of the five children. 
Her story, well, it's hard to explain. 
It is layers of complicated. 
There are many highs and lows. 
When we got to PAP #Port no one #believed she was real. 
It... 
All of it, still has a sting.
People pointed.
The questions still hang in my mind, for Haiti, Africa, India.
All the places I have been have a thread that pulls them, lumps them into a space and place that seems like it shouldn't be real. 
Time worked against us on this trip, this one and others. 
Her life would hang in the balance more than once.
Her life set a fire in motion deep within.  

Sunday, August 23, 2015

The Boy, my boy


This was Oct. 2000, five brave friends embarked on a journey to #HaitiOn this journey they would cross paths with five #miracle children. 
He stood in his tiny mountain village with his family watching us with curiosity as if nothing was wrong. 
Nothing, outside of the fact that his leg had literally burst from within because of raging infection lingering from a break several months prior to our visit. 
He is now grown. 
He calls me "mom". #blessed 
He knows his story well, I have lived it with him, walked the same dirt roads with him and actually met his family. 
His story has tested my faith to the core of my being. 
His story has given me hope, compassion and the ability to fight for something outside of myself.